Decent User Experience – A New Human Right?

We digital designers, of all hues, generally like to tell ourselves that we’re doing more than simply earning a wage; building wireframes, pushing pixels etc.  We’re making people’s lives better.

We also tend to believe that the businesses that ultimately foot our bills, take a more prosaic view; it’s all about the brand and the bottom line.

I think that there is something more profound going on here; I’m arguing that we should start to see ourselves as playing a small, but active, part in one of history’s grand narratives.  A big claim I know, for a UX blog post.  But bear with me, I guarantee you’ll be rewarded, and hopefully even, convinced.

I’ve recently been reading Steven Pinker’s excellent book on the little known fact that we’re currently enjoying the results of a multi-century long decline in violence – in all it’s forms; in crime, in war, in murder, in abuse, in discrimination.  In fact, in pretty much any form of oppression and violation of another human being’s experience of life.  The book goes into the details of this happy decline in countless different areas – here’s an example, a chart looking at the massive decline of murder rates in Europe, in comparison to the those of non-state societies.

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Homicide rates in Western Europe, 1300-2000 and in nonstate societies.  From p459 of The Better Angels of Our Nature

The past was indeed a very different country – and i’d much rather be living in the here and now.

In the dim, and sadly, not so distant, past, life was cheap, authoritarian hierarchies were unassailable and invulnerable, divisions between nations and social groups were impenetrable and perhaps most importantly, liberal enlightenment philosophy had not infected our psyche with its celebration of the ‘individual’.   Today we live in a world of ‘individualism’, a world suffused by information bearing other people’s perspectives; a world in which it is ever harder to be completely blind and unsympathetic to the experiences, and suffering of others.

But what does this have to do with software user experiences? I hear you say.  Well, one of the driving forces behind this incredible change in the fabric of our culture, over the past half a century, is what Pinker refers to as the ‘Rights Revolutions’.  I believe that the value we place on good user experience should be seen in the context of these revolutions.

I am asking the question: is a decent user experience a new human right?

The Rights Revolutions

So, what are these ‘Rights Revolutions’? And what do they have to do with user experience?  Well to quote Pinker:

“The efforts to stigmatize, and in many cases criminalize, temptations to violence have been advanced in a cascade of campaigns for ‘rights’ – civil rights, women’s rights, children’s rights, gay rights and animal rights”
From p458 of The Better Angels of Our Nature

rights-02

Proportion of books mentioning phrases from 1945. From p459 of The Better Angels of Our Nature

This cascade is nicely illustrated by the graph below that shows the sequence in which these phrases have become popular.  There’s a momentum behind these changes, each rights revolution raises the bar, as to what is acceptable, setting the stage for the next move forward.  If it’s not right to racially discriminate, how can we be tolerating sexual discrimination?  If we can no longer mistreat children, why should we be able to mistreat animals?

These changes, Pinker suggests, are primarily driven by “the technologies that made ideas and people increasingly mobile”.  As people were increasingly brought into contact with other people’s perspectives, through fiction, through travel, through the sharing of ideas; it became increasingly hard to maintain that other peoples experiences didn’t matter.   We increasingly came to value the rights of the individual and to sympathise with their experience. That has driven and continues to drive important and largely positive changes to the world we live in.

The right to a decent user experience?

Nothing has been as powerful in driving the large scale improvement to the quality of user experience, as the web.  Businesses got the ability to make user experience changes relatively rapidly and see the big impacts to bottom line metrics.  Perhaps more importantly, users got the ability to easily switch over to whichever site offered them the best experience for getting what they wanted.

This commercial dynamic has, sadly, been far less successful at driving substantial improvement to the user experience of specialist business software – an area that RMA specialises in.  Sadly business software is still generally sold through bulk licensing arrangements and bought by IT managers or business folk more interested in ticking boxes than in the merits of good design, or the experiences of users.

I think this is something that needs to, and is about to change.  Just because someone isn’t immediately visible as a monetizable metric on a web analytics dashboard, doesn’t mean they don’t matter.  People who work at a job day-in day-out to get important things done, matter.  Their experience is important; perhaps more important, than those of the hordes of debt-laden e-shoppers.

Let’s face it, badly designed software can make people’s life pretty miserable; unnecessarily hard to learn tools that make you feel stupid, inefficient experiences that frustratingly waste time, confused designs that hinder rather than help you get things done, ugly jarring experiences that make life just that little bit greyer.

Thanks to the web and mobile app ecosystems people are almost universally exposed to good user experience – they know what they are missing in the software that plagues their work lives.  At RMA we are witnessing this rising tide of intolerance to bad design in enterprise software. People are rising up against it; we have seen them demanding more from their bosses, their IT departments and their services providers.  They are starting to side step restrictive IT restrictions by bringing in their own devices (BYOD) and using decently designed cloud based offerings.  B2B software houses are starting to increase their investments in UX and visual design. The tide is starting to turn.

There are many powerful, financially driven, arguments for investing in better user experiences; they increase productivity while decreasing support and training costs.  But I believe that we can perhaps help the tide turn faster if we start to reframe the need for change.

We need to help shape and nurture the awareness of the right for decent user experience in all those millions of business software users. And, perhaps, more importantly those of us who work on business products, need to build a culture in which it is simply not acceptable to ship bad user experiences.  Just as it isn’t acceptable to discriminate against employees, or to cheat your customers, it shouldn’t be acceptable to subject people to bad user experiences.

For better or worse, most of us live much of our lives in software; just as life is precious, so are experiences.

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